Help keep the site going

Tuesday, 29 June 2010

S.S.TRURO

Ship No 356


S.S.TRURO



S.S. Truro was a single screw Cargo Steamer, to help replace war loses. At 1795 tons, with a length of 280 feet and a beam of 42 feet, they were very fine looking ships with graceful lines. She drew a draught of 25 feet and 3 inches.

She was launched from the yard on 12th December 1946. She operated all over the Med.

In 1968 she was sold to Kuwait, renamed Gulf Noor.

Sunday, 27 June 2010

S.S.TINTO



Ship No 355

S.S.TINTO

This was the lead ship of a very large order for Henry Robb from the Ellerman Wilson Line. Ellerman were re-building after there heavy war losses.

The order was for 6 in ships in total. Four single screw cargo steamers and two twin screwed steamer’s.

S.S. Tinto was a single screw Cargo Steamer, to help replace war loses. At 1795 tons, with a length of 280 feet and a beam of 42 feet, they were very fine looking ships with graceful lines. She drew a draught of 25 feet and 3 inches.

She was launched from the yard on 12th December 1946.

S.S.TINTO (Ship No 355)
Ellerman Wilson Line

M.V. KATUI

Ship No 354

Was the second of a two ship order from an old customer of the shipyard, The Union Steamship Company of New Zealand.

The sister ship to “Kanna”

She was a standard “B” type single screw diesel cargo, coaster, She was 942 gross and 1,280 deadweight tons powered by a Bermeister & Wain diesel engine. Length overall of 210 feet with a beam of 36 feet and 6 inches, she was launched from the yard on 21/11/1945. She worked the coast of New Zealand for 21 years before being sold in 1967 and renamed "Cindee", then re-named in 1974 with the name "Banang" and broken up in 1984.

Still awaiting a photo of this fine old ship.

M.V. KANNA

M.V.KANNA
Ship No 353



With the end of World War 2 companies needed to rebuild and for shipping companies that meant replacing war losses. For this the Union Steamship Company of New Zealand turned to their trusted shipbuilder in Scotland.

M.V. Kanna,

Was the first of a two ship order from an old customer of the shipyard, The Union Steamship Company of New Zealand.

She was a standard “B” type single screw diesel cargo, coaster, She was 942 gross and 1,280 deadweight tons powered by a Bermeister & Wain diesel engine. Length overall of 210 feet with a beam of 36 feet and 6 inches, she was launched from the yard on 23/10/1945.

Originally ordered by the British Admiralty for SE Asia as a supply ship but taken over by Union Steamship Company in 1945. She was to be used on the Gisborne, Napier, Wellington, Lyttelton, Timaru, Oamaru and Dunedin service. After great service to the Union Steamship Co of New Zealand she was sold 1967 to Singapore interests.

M.V. REDSTART

Ship No 352

M.V. Redstart was the second vessel of the two ship order from the General Steam Navigation Company Ltd.

She was built for the coastal trade around the British Isles. She was a single screw diesel cargo vessel of 629 tons.

She had a length overall of 180 feet and a beam of 32 feet and 10 inches, and draught of 20 feet and 5 inches.

She was launched from the shipyard on 5th of March 1946. There has been no photo’s of this vessel available up to now.

M.V.CORNCRAKE

M.V. CORNCRAKE
Ship No 351



With the end of World War 2 companies needed to rebuild and for shipping companies that meant replacing war losses.

M.V.CORNCRAKE was the first ship of a two ship order from the General Steam Navigation Company Ltd.

She was built for the coastal trade around the British Isles. She was a single screw diesel cargo vessel of 629 tons.

She had a length overall of 180 feet and a beam of 32 feet and 10 inches, and draught of 20 feet and 5 inches.

She was launched on 20th December 1945 into the peacetime waters of the River Forth.

H.M.S. PADSTOW BAY

H.M.S.PADSTOW BAY
Ship No 350



Twin screw “Bay Class” Frigate.

This was to be the last warship built at the Henry Robb shipyard.

She was the third and last of the Bay Class Anti-Aircraft Frigate’s.

She was initially ordered on 19th January 1944 for build as a LOCH Class Anti-submarine Frigate, but the contract was changed later that year before build had commenced.

Originally to have been named H.M.S.LOCH COULSIDE she was laid down as an Anti-Aircraft Frigate on 25th September 1944 and launched as H.M.S. PADSTOW BAY by Henry Robb at Leith on 28th August 1945. She was the first Royal Navy ship to carry this name and build was completed on 11th March 1946.


H.M.S.PADSTOW BAY
Bay Class Frigate


Was a modified Loch Class to convert to Anti-aircraft. They carried heavier Anti-aircraft weaponry and radar director. Still carried a hedgehog and depth charges but primary role was now Anti-aircraft, intended to give support to the D Day landings and for the Pacific theatre, where the main threat was from air attack. Use of pre-fabrication and the ability to use a common hull for different variants were features that ensured much of the Bay and Loch classes would influence post war Escort design. The excellent sea-keeping qualities of the hulls were ably demonstrated on several occasions when ships of the class rode out Typhoons which were a common hazard in the Far East.

By the mid 1950 the usefulness, against modern aircraft was in decline.

H.M.S. CARNARVON BAY

H.M.S.CARNARVON BAY

Ship No 349

Twin screw “Bay Class” Frigate.


Second of the BAY Class Anti-Aircraft Frigate’s initially ordered on 25th January 1943 for build as a LOCH Class Anti-Submarine Frigate, but for which the ordered was changed in 1944. Originally to have been named H.M.S.LOCH MADDY.

She was laid down on 8th June 1944 and launched as H.M.S.CARNARVON BAY by Henry Robb shipyard at Leith on 15th March 1945.

She was launched two months before the war with Germany was to end, but of course the war with Japan continued, until August 1945.

She was the first Royal Navy ship to carry this name she was completed on 20th September 1945

She served in home waters for a few years before being laid up, then she was eventually sold for scrap in 1959.

A short career for a fine ship.

H.M.S. CARDIGAN BAY



H.M.S. CARDIGAN BAY

Ship No 348



Twin screw “Bay Class” Frigate.

H.M.S. Cardigan Bay was the first of three Bay Class Frigates ordered from the Henry Robb yard.

She was built by Henry Robb of Leith in 1943 and was to be named HMS Loch Laxford but due to a policy change and a need for anti-aircraft escorts for service in the Far East the contract was changed and the design was changed to that of a “Bay” Class Anti-aircraft frigate and laid down on the 14th of April 1944 as Ship No 348. She was launched on 28th December 1944 as HMS Cardigan Bay, the first ship to carry the name. Her build was completed on 15th June 1945.
She was commissioned in June 1945 and was to serve in the Pacific War Zone but with the declaration of VJ Day on 15 August her Far East Service was deferred.

She served in the Mediterranean including surveillance in the Corfu Channel in 1946 after the mining of HM Ships Saumarez and Volage by Albania. She undertook patrols in the Adriatic and Red Sea intercepting ships attempting to transport illegal Jewish immigrants to Palestine.
In 1949 she transferred to the Far East and served on patrols and bombardments during the Malayan Emergency, Yangste Estuary and Formosa Strait.

She completed five operational tours during the Korean War 1950-1953, where she gained a Battle Honour

She entered the Reserve and in March 1962 was towed to the West of Scotland (Troon) ship breaking where, by early September her destruction was completed.


TuneUp Utilities 2014 - Free Download!
Cardigan Bay was an unassuming small warship, a workhorse of escort groups, designed and built for the Second War. She was one of a numerous class, none of whose names became famous or even well–known in history.

H.M.S.CARDIGAN BAY

Bay Class Frigate


Was a modified Loch Class to convert to Anti-aircraft. They carried heavier Anti-aircraft weaponry and radar director. Still carried a hedgehog and depth charges but primary role was now Anti-aircraft, intended to give support to the D Day landings and for the Pacific theatre, where the main threat was from air attack. Use of pre-fabrication and the ability to use a common hull for different variants were features that ensured much of the Bay and Loch classes would influence post war Escort design. The excellent sea-keeping qualities of the hulls were ably demonstrated on several occasions when ships of the class rode out Typhoons which were a common hazard in the Far East.

By the mid 1950 the usefulness against modern aircraft was in decline.



what where



job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

Sunday, 20 June 2010

H.M.S. LOCH KATRINE





H.M.N.Z.S.ROTOITI

Ship No 347
Twin screw “Loch Class” Frigate.

The British Pacific Fleet The British Pacific Fleet
In August 1944 the British Pacific Fleet did not exist. Six months later it was strong enough to launch air attacks on Japanese territory, and by the end of the war it constituted the most powerful force in the history of the Royal Navy, fighting as professional equals alongside the US Navy in the thick of the action. How this was achieved by a nation nearing exhaustion after five years of conflict is a story of epic proportions in which ingenuity, diplomacy and dogged persistence all played a part. As much a political as a technical triumph, the BPF was uniquely complex in its make-up: its C-in-C was responsible to the Admiralty for the general direction of his Fleet; took operational orders from the American Admiral Nimitz; answered to the Government of Australia for the construction and maintenance of a vast base infrastructure, and to other Commonwealth Governments for the ships and men that formed his fully-integrated multi-national fleet.This ground-breaking new work by David Hobbs describes the background, creation and expansion of the BPF from its first tentative strikes, through operations off the coast of Japan to its impact on the immediate post-war period, including the opinions of USN liaison officers attached to the British flagships. The book is the first to demonstrate the real scope and scale of the BPF’s impressive achievement.


Third LOCH built in Leith by Henry Robb.
Laid down 31 Dec 1943

Launched 21 Aug 1944

Commissioned 29 Dec 1944

Refitted in Londonderry for service with East Indies Escort Force (June - July 1945)

East Indies Service
Commanding Officers: Lieut. Commander Bidwell RNR

Lieut. Commander A C D Leach DSC RN
Took passage with LOCH QUOICH (July 1945).

Escort of assault convoys for Operation ZIPPER (September 1945).

Present at Singapore for re-occupation (September 1945).

Went to Bangkok with Officials (November 1945). Guardship and Patrols from Batavia and Padang (December 1945).

East Coast of India patrol and escort (January 1946).

Air-Sea rescue duty in Indian Ocean. Relieved LOCH ACHRAY (February)

Sailed for UK in company with LOCH TARBERT.

Paid off into Reserve at Portsmouth (April).

(From www.Naval-History.net)

Became the new Zealand ship H.M.N.Z.S. Rotoiti
HMNZS Rotoiti (formerly HMS Loch Katrine), a Loch-class anti-submarine frigate, was commissioned in 1949. It operated in a variety of roles including a two deployments to Korea during the Korean War from 1950-51 and 1952-53, involvement in the nuclear bomb tests, Christmas Island, 1957, and undertaking weather reporting duties between New Zealand and Antarctica as part of 'Operation Deep Freeze' in 1961-63.


H.M.N.Z.S.ROTOITI
Being one of six frigates purchased from the Royal Navy in 1947 by the Royal New Zealand Navy (Two of them being ex-Henry Robb built ships), designated the 11th Flotilla. The six ships were modernised in the United Kingdom, before sailing to New Zealand in groups between 1948 and 1949.

She was decommissioned in August 1965.

Then sold to be broken up for scrap in September 1966.


The New Zealand Loch Class – Some Historical Notes.

These were developed from the slightly smaller River Class frigates and were designed as anti-submarine convoy escorts. In 1947, NZ looked at buying seven of these frigates from the RN – six for anti-submarine work and the seventh as a survey ship. However, by June 1948, the seventh frigate was put on hold.



All six Lochs served as AS escorts protecting shipping in the North Atlantic approaches to the British Isles. Loch Eck (Hawea) was on Russian convoys to Murmansk in 1945 and was responsible/aided in the sinking of 4 U-Boats. All paid off into reserve 1945-46.



The six frigates were refitted at either Devonport, Portsmouth, Chatham and Sheerness and prepared for the RNZNs needs. Initial manning came from the corvettes Arabis and Arbutus and further crew members came from a recruiting drive from the RN.



Loch Eck K422 Hawea F422 1/10/48 to 15/2/57 - ZMXF

Loch Achray K426 Kaniere F426 28/9/48 to 22/12/60 - ZMXG

Loch Achanalt K424 Pukaki F424 13/9/48 to 24/5/65 - ZMXD

Loch Katrine K625 Rotoiti F625 7/6/49 to 6/8/65 - ZMXK

Loch Shin K421 Taupo F421 13/9/48 to 26/1/53 - ZMXC

Loch Morlich K517 Tutira F517 11/4/49 to 31/8/51 - ZMXJ



The six frigates formed the 11th Frigate Flotilla in August 1948, with Taupo designated as Senior Officer. This changed when the first four ships arrived in NZ and from March 1949, the NZ Squadron had the SO in HMNZS Bellona.



All six Lochs were named after NZ Lakes.



(My thanks, to Jim Dell for the above.)

Saturday, 19 June 2010

H.M.S. LOCH INSH

H.M.S.LOCH INSH
Ship No 346



Twin screw “Loch Class” Frigate.

Second of the Loch Class to be built at the Leith yard, of Henry Robb Ltd.

LOCH-Class Twin Screw Frigate ordered from Henry Robb, Leith on 25th January 1943 and laid down as Ship No 346 in November 1943. The ship was launched on 10th May 1944 as the 1st RN ship to carry the name. Her build was completed on 20th October 1944. The ship was ‘adopted’ by the civil community of Northampton after entering service.
HMS LOCH INCH while on the Russian Convoy duty (Convoy RA66)

sank U307 using SHARK projectiles and SQUID in the attacks.

She rescued 14 survivors from the destroyed U-Boat.

She served world wide with the Royal Navy for 18 years after the end of World War 2
HMS LOCH INSH was placed on the Disposal List and sold to the Royal Malayan Navy in 1963. After a very extensive refit at Portsmouth which included change’s to the aft superstructure and the provision of Helicopter landing facilities, the ship was renamed HANG TUAH. She sailed for Malaya on 12th November 1964 and served as the Flagship of the Royal Malaysian Navy until 1971 when she was used as a training ship until withdrawn from service 6 years later.
H.M.S. Loch Inch had a working life of more than 30 years.

H.M.S. LOCH INSH
“Loch Class” Frigates.
The ships of the Loch class of A/S frigates represent the final product of wartime design of frigates.

Atlantic Escorts

They were designed to be mass produced in sections at dispersed sites and transported to an assembly point at a slipway.

Welding and riveting were used to speed production of the unit construction techniques and it took fewer men to produce a ship of this class.

With a single 4 in gun on the foc’sle for surface action, the main weapons were beyond doubt the twin squid anti-submarine mortars, along with the high mounted rapid firing twin 20mm guns for anti-personnel work.

To speed construction curved structures were eliminated in the design making the lofting a little bit more simple and a noticeable result of this was that the deck sheer was reduced to three straight lines, from stern to bow.


Battle of the Atlantic Battle of the Atlantic
World War II was only a few hours old when the Battle of the Atlantic, the longest campaign of the Second World War and the most complex submarine war in history, began with the sinking of the unarmed passenger liner Athenia by the German submarine U30. Based on the mastery of the latest research and written from a mid-Atlantic - rather than the traditional Anglo-centric - perspective, Marc Milner focuses on the confrontation between opposing forces and the attacks on Allied shipping that lay at the heart of the six-year struggle. Against the backdrop of the battle for the Atlantic lifeline he charts the fascinating development of U-boats and the techniques used by the Allies to suppress and destroy these stealth weapons.

H.M.S. ORANGVILLE

  Bestsellers at eBooks.com!
 

H.M.C.S.ORANGEVILLE

Ship No 345

Twin screw “Castle Class” Corvette.

The third of the class built at Leith, she was originally named H.M.S. HEDDINGHAM CASTLE
With a Speed of 16 knots she had a Compliment of 105 Crew and 7 Officers.

She was armed with 1-4" Gun, 6-20mm (2 x II, 2 x I), and a Squid for anti submarine attack.

She sailed under the Pendant: (K491)

Her Keel was laid down on 23rd of July 1943

And she was launched: on the 26th of January 1944, after her sea trials she was commissioned on 24th April 1944. H.M.C.S. ORANGEVILLE served in the North Atlantic shepherding many convoys across the dangerous seas between Halifax Nova Scotia and the British Isles.

She was sold into mercantile service in 1947 and she was re-named Ta Tung.

She was to go through a few names and ended up being the Chinese ship

Te An in 1951.
H.M.S.ORANGEVILLE
“Castle Class” Corvette.
Designed as an improved Flower Class Corvette with a strengthened bow to mount the Squid Anti Submarine Mortar and longer to accommodate the sonar’s and improve sea keeping. However the Castle used the same power plant as the Flower and being larger she was hopelessly under powered. Helmsmen found it difficult to hold the ship in heavy seas and at low revs they lacked manoeuvring ability, crucial for the Squid which could not be aimed, the ship had to turn onto the target.


Hotels in New York Despite the design difficulties their crew’s stuck to the job and were very successful in the battle of the Atlantic and they also fought in the bitter waters of the Artic Convoys to Russia.

These Castle Class Corvettes were a much improved vessel to the Flower class Corvettes The improved length designed by William Reed of Smith's Dock made these more suitable for Atlantic Weather conditions. With the Addition of Squid which improved its anti Submarine capabilities.

Friday, 18 June 2010

H.M.S. HESPELER

 
 
H.M.C.S. HESPELER

Ship No 344


Twin screw “Castle Class” Corvette.

Second of the class to be built in Leith, started life as HMS Guildford Castle (K378) 13th November 1943 Served with the Canadian Navy as H.M.C.S. Hespeler (K489) in 1944.
Her keel was laid down on 25th of May 1943

She was launched from the Leith yard on the 13th Nov 1943

After successful sea trials she was commissioned on the 28th Feb 1944

Fondly remembered by Canadians who served with her, during the Battle of the Atlantic

Converted to the merchant ship “Chilcotin” in 1947, then renamed “Stella Maris” in 1958.

Castle Class Corvette.


Designed as an improved Flower Class Corvette with a strengthened bow to mount the Squid Anti Submarine Mortar and longer to accommodate the sonar’s and improve sea keeping. However the Castle used the same power plant as the Flower and being larger she was hopelessly under powered. Helmsmen found it difficult to hold the ship in heavy seas and at low revs they lacked manoeuvring ability, crucial for the Squid which could not be aimed, the ship had to turn onto the target.

Despite the design difficulties their crew’s stuck to the job and were very successful in the battle of the Atlantic and they also fought in the bitter waters of the Artic Convoys to Russia.

These Castle Class Corvettes were a much improved vessel to the Flower class Corvettes The improved length designed by William Reed of Smith's Dock made these more suitable for Atlantic Weather conditions. With the Addition of Squid which improved its anti Submarine capabilities.


Introduction to Naval Architecture Introduction to Naval Architecture
Written by an award-winning naval architecture author and former vice-president of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects (RINA), the fifth edition of Introduction to Naval Architecture has been fully updated to take in advances in the field and is ideal both for those approaching the subject for the first time and those looking to update or refresh their knowledge on areas outside of their direct expertise. This book provides a broad appreciation of the science and art of naval architecture, explaining the subject in physical rather than in mathematical terms. While covering basic principles, such as hull geometry, propulsion, and stability, the book also addresses contemporary topics, such as computer aided design and computer aided manufacture (CAD/CAM). The new edition reflects the continuing developments in technology, changes in international regulations and recent research. Knowledge of the fundamentals of naval architecture is essential not only for newcomers to the field but also the wealth of non-naval architects working in the marine area, including marine engineers, marine surveyors and ship crews. This book provides the most well-known and trusted introduction to the topic, offering a clear and concise take on the basics of this broad field. Praise for previous edition "...a clear and concise introduction to the subject, giving a good grasp of the basics of naval architecture." Maritime Journal "...my go-to book for understanding the general principles of naval architecture. The book is well-written and easy to understand." Amazon.com reviewer Provides a perfect introduction to naval architecture for newcomers to the field and a compact overview for related marine professionals needing a working knowledge of the area Updated to cover key developments including double-hulled tankers and the increased use of computational methods and modeling in ship design Draws on the experience of renowned naval architecture author Eric Tupper to provide extensive scope and authoritative detail, all in an accessible and approachable style

Tuesday, 15 June 2010

H.M.S. FLINT CASTLE

H.M.S.FLINT CASTLE

Ship No 343

Twin screw “Castle Class” Corvette.

H.M.S. Flint Castle was the first of the “Castle Class” Corvettes to be built at the Leith yard.


She was 1,370 tons and some thirty five feet longer than her predecessor the “Flower Class” with a length of 225 feet and a beam of 36 feet and 6 inches, to improve sea-keeping.
She was laid down on 20th April 1943 and Launched on 1st of September 1943 (4 months build time)
After sea trials she was commissioned into the Royal Navy on 31st December 1943.


H.M.S. FLINT CASTLE
Here showing her sea-keeping ability, surfing the rollers of the North Atlantic Ocean.
Photo was taken from H.M.S. Rushen Castle by Lt McMullan.

She was assigned to the Clyde Escort Force for the rest of the war, and had thirteen years continuous service with the Royal Navy before being broken up in 1958.


Castle Class Corvette

Designed as an improved Flower Class Corvette with a strengthened bow to mount the Squid Anti Submarine Mortar and longer to accommodate the sonar’s and improve sea keeping. They were fine looking ships.

However the Castle used the same power plant as the Flower and being larger she was hopelessly under powered. Helmsmen found it difficult to hold the ship in heavy seas and at low revs they lacked manoeuvring ability, crucial for the Squid which could not be aimed, the ship had to turn onto the target.

Despite the design difficulties their crew’s stuck to the job and were very successful in the battle of the Atlantic and they also fought in the bitter waters of the Artic Convoys to Russia.

These Castle Class Corvettes were a much improved vessel to the Flower class Corvettes The improved length designed by William Reed of Smith's Dock made these more suitable for Atlantic Weather conditions. With the Addition of Squid which improved its anti Submarine capabilities
H.M.S.FLINT CASTLE
what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

Monday, 14 June 2010

H.M.S. LOCH ACHANALT

As H.M.N.Z.S.PUKAKI

Ship No 342


Twin screw “Loch Class” Frigate.


She was a LOCH-Class Frigate originally ordered on 24th July 1942 to be built as a RIVER-Class Frigate to be named NAVER. The order changed for a Twin Screw Fast Frigate during 1943 and she was laid down on 14th September 1943 Launched on 23rd March 1944 and build was completed on 11th August 1944. She was loaned to the Royal Canadian Navy (H.M.C.S.LOCH ACHANALT) for Atlantic convoy duty and while working in tandem with H.M.S.Annan she was credited with the sinking of U-1006.

H.M.S. LOCH ACHANALT
H.M.S. Loch Achanalt was returned to the Royal Navy and was sold to New Zealand in 1947 and renamed. 
HMNZS PUKAKI.

Being one of six frigates purchased from the Royal Navy in 1947 by the Royal New Zealand Navy, designated the 11th Flotilla. The six ships were modernised in the United Kingdom, before sailing to New Zealand in groups between 1948 and 1949. Most of the ship's time in the Royal New Zealand Navy was spent in various combinations of training and exercise duties, and as part of the New Zealand commitment to support British interest in the Far East, as well as extended periods spent in reserve. During the Korean War, H.M.N.Z.S. PUKAKI  made an operational deployment to the combat zone in 1950 as part of the United Nations commitment to the conflict. She also deployed to the British nuclear tests at Christmas Island - Operation Grapple - as a weather ship in 1957 to 1958, and later as a combination weather/radar picket/rescue ship during Operation Deep Freeze, operating to the edge of the Antarctic pack ice between 1964 and 1965. She was sold for scrap in 1965.

what where



job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

Sunday, 13 June 2010

H.M.S. WYE





H.M.S. WYE

Ship No 341


Twin screw “River Class” Frigate.



She was Laid down 18 Nov 1942

Launched 16 Aug 1943

Commissioned 9 Feb 1944

H.M.S. WYE was scrapped 22 February 1955.

The 'Flower' class Corvettes were not fast enough or big enough for the North Atlantic, so, in 1940 the Admiralty decided on speedier and larger vessels.


Orders for these vessels, first referred to as 'Twin Screw Corvettes' were quickly placed with various yards around the U.K. They were to be known as 'River' class Frigates.


Flying the Red Duster Flying the Red Duster
Following the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force from Dunkirk in 1940, Britain was at her most vulnerable. France had capitulated and the Germans had control of ports from the Arctic to the Mediterranean. Nazi U-boats were at Britain's doorstep, and in that year alone they sunk 204 ships, a gross tonnage of 2,435,667. Britain stood alone against Germany and a vital lifeline was the supplies carried by the civilian Merchant Navy, defended only by the thinly stretched Royal Navy. Winston Churchill conceded that his greatest fear was the slaughter of merchant seaman, who worked in harsh conditions, were often poorly fed, and were always at the mercy of the Kriegsmarine. In Flying the Red Duster, Morris Beckman tells the story of his experiences as a merchant seaman during the Battle of the Atlantic, part of the civilian force which enabled Britain to avoid capitulation to Nazi Germany. Based on his wartime diary - the unique document now held at the Imperial War Museum - this work allows the reader unique access to a time which is fast slipping from living memory.





“River Class" Frigate.


This class was developed to have the same capabilities as the pre WW11 "Black Swan" class. However, they were much simpler, cheaper and easier to build with "Reciprocating" rather than "Steam Turbine" power plants. They were designed to be 50ft. longer, at 300ft., than the contemporary "Castle Class", and so the task of building them could not be carried out in many smaller "Civilian" yards.

Designed as an improved Flower Class Corvette the River Class were highly successful Convoy Escorts with long range, heavy depth charge load and good sea keeping. Built in both Canada and Britain they became the mainstay of the Atlantic Escorts in the latter stages of the war.

They were however amongst the first vessels to be built part welded and riveted, which meant that units could be built around the country and delivered to the shipyard for building. A method pioneered by the British yards, and indeed the way ships are still built to this day.

H.M.S. WYE
The design was also used as the basis of the USN "Tacoma class", known to the RN as the "Colony Class". The hull design was later elaborated into the "Loch and Bay Class" Frigates


Atlantic Escorts Atlantic Escorts
Winston Churchill famously claimed that the submarine war in the Atlantic was the only campaign of the Second World War that really frightened him. If the lifeline to north America had been cut, Britain would never have survived; there could have been no build-up of US and Commonwealth forces, no D-Day landings, and no victory in western Europe. Furthermore, the battle raged from the first day of the war until the final German surrender, making it the longest and arguably hardest-fought campaign of the whole war. The ships, technology and tactics employed by the Allies form the subject of this book. Beginning with the lessons apparently learned from the First World War, the author outlines inter-war developments in technology and training, and describes the later preparations for the second global conflict. When the war came the balance of advantage was to see-saw between U-boats and escorts, with new weapons and sensors introduced at a rapid rate. For the defending navies, the prime requirement was numbers, and the most pressing problem was to improve capability without sacrificing simplicity and speed of construction. The author analyses the resulting designs of sloops, frigates, corvettes and destroyer escorts and attempts to determine their relative effectiveness.




what where



job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

H.M.S. WINDRUSH




H.M.S.WINDRUSH

Ship No 340


Twin screw “River Class” Frigate.

Laid down 18th Nov 1942

Launched 18th Jun 1943

Commissioned 3rd Nov 1943

End service with the Royal Navy Feb 1944

as La Decouverte flying the French Flag


She served as an escort to the Atlantic convoys, under Canadian Navy before being tansferred to the F.N.F.L. (Free French) in February 1944 and renamed La Découverte.

She took part in the Normandy invasion in support of the Canadian 3rd Battalion on Juno Beach.
See http://www.normandy1944.org.uk/  
She served the French Navy until being de-commissioned in the late 1950’s and she was beached just outside Cherbourg where she was used as a training ship, and later as a fire control practise ship, she was only scrapped last year in 2009, such a waste of the only remaining class of her type still around.

River Class Frigate


Beached just outside of Cherbourg, untill 2009.
Designed as an improved Flower Class Corvette the River Class were highly successful Convoy Escorts with long range, heavy depth charge load and good sea keeping. Built in both Canada and Britain they became the mainstay of the Atlantic Escorts in the latter stages of the war.
what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

Saturday, 12 June 2010

H.M.S. WALLASEA

H.M.S.WALLASEA (Under way)
Ship No 339


Isle Class armed trawler.

An order for an armed trawler of the “Isle Class”

Primarily used for “Minesweeping” duties.

She was 463 tons, with an overall length of 150 feet, with a beam of 27 feet and 6 inches, and a draught of 14 feet and 6 inches.

She was launched from the yard on 22nd of April 1943.

H.M.S. Wallasea was to have a short war service as she was sunk by an E-Boat attack off the coast of Cornwall while on escort duty the 6th Jan 1944.