Help keep the site going

Wednesday, 12 November 2014

MOD may now build Royal Navy ships overseas

Shipbuilding and Politics such unlikely and poor partners as ever, unless there is a war looming of course.


And so it begins with this latest story from the Scotsman newspaper, everyone knows that they can be got cheaper by buying overseas, just ask the Australian Navy (but don't mention the problems and cost over runs) they could even just buy a finished hull and tow  it to a U.K. yard for outfitting and weapons platform fitting but at what cost to this Island Nation which was built on ships and shipbuilding.
For more on this stupid story read here

 It is also not new as they (MOD) have already gone to South Korea for the build of three fleet tankers for the RFA as there is no longer the capacity or expertise to build vessels such as this any more in the U.K. (There words not mine)

Tuesday, 11 November 2014

The Buy Hibs Group


The shipyards of Leith (All of them) have long had a connection to Hibernian Football Club (Hibs)
and as such the Blog at Leith Built Ships are happy to do a little bit to publicise an intended Supporters Buy Out to return the Football club to the supporters of the team.
The organisation Help to Buy Back Hibs has been set up and a website is now online for any pledges of support to return this fine club to it's rightful place in Scottish Football, innovators since 1875 so who knows this may well help return the Glory Days to Easter Road Stadium.


www.buyhibs.org



 

Sunday, 9 November 2014

850,000 Poppy's each one a life lost

We should never forget

 
Each ceramic poppy represents a life lost in World War I


We should be able to learn from History


 
 

Thursday, 6 November 2014

The Arctic Convoys to Russia

 
 
 
 

The Arctic Convoys

 

As we approach the annual remembrance day ceremonies Worldwide (November 11th) It is poignant at this time that some of the brave or should I say very brave sailors who were allocated to run the gauntlet of voyages from the U.K. to the Northern ports of Russia during the Second World War are at long last to receive some recognition some 70 years after they faced some of the harshest conditions of anyone who spent there wartime experiences at sea.

 

Dozens of veterans who braved freezing conditions to maintain a lifeline between the Soviet Union and the west during the Second World War will finally be honoured at a medal-giving ceremony today.

The Arctic convoys boasted crews of British and other allied navies who sailed vital supplies to soldiers battling against Hitler in the Eastern Front.

Fleets of merchant vessels were flanked by Royal Navy warships and dozens were lost as they were attacked from the air and sea.

The are to be honoured by the Russians at a ceremony which will see so few of the brave still left.

For more on the story from the local Edinburgh Evening News

Friday, 31 October 2014

Leith Ship & The Pirates

 
 
 
 
The Ex Wilson Line Leith Built MV SORRENTO as Al Marjan receiving assistance from the U.S. Navy in this old released photograph taken from USS Whidbey Island

The ex MV SORRENTO was to go on and have many different names over her life span of 43 years as a useful working vessel, same ship with a different name traded around some of the many smaller and somewhat less reputable shipping lines, she was sold on by the Gracechurch line to be re-named as Waybridge in 1983 next in line was the name of Five Stars three years later in 1986 only to change her name again six years on from being called Five Stars she then took on the name Sea Princes in 1992 to trade under this name before yet another name change this time in 1997 to be named as the MV ALBATROS, before she was to take her last and final known name of AL MARJAN in the year 2000.
As the Al Marjan she would end up captured by Somalia Pirates in 2007, read more about the amazing ships history at the Leith Shipyards website



 
 
 
 
 

Thursday, 30 October 2014

MV ARGOS Shipwreck

The MV ARGOS was Ship No 216 from the Leith Shipyards of Henry Robb Ltd, and we have just been sent some more information and photographs about her and her eventual fate in Argentina.

This was another one of the special ships built at the Leith Shipyards of Henry Robb Ltd, she was of a design that the shipyard was becoming very adept at and for work on the Tidal Rivers of South America.
The MV ARGOS was destined for work on the famous River Plate in Argentina. Her owners were Compagnia Argentina de Lanches, Buenos Aires, which was the South American branch of The Forestal Land, Timber & Railways Company of London.

The wreck of the MV ARGOS


You can read a whole lot more about this shipwreck at the Leith Shipyards website

 

Monday, 20 October 2014

Robb Caledon Shipyards






The ex Duchray Ship No 517 built at the Leith Shipyards of Robb Caledon now re-named as Eide Rex


Good to see she is still working away in gainful employment as seen in the photographs from the shipspotting website it is just a pity that they cannot get it correct where she was actually built, perhaps due to the confusion of when Henry Robb Ltd amalgamated with the Caledon shipyard of Dundee in 1968 to be called Robb Caledon Ltd, the dominant partner is shown in the name and for the avoidance of any doubt she and some 500 other ships were built at the Leith Shipyards of Henry Robb Ltd, later to be called Robb Caledon Ltd then to revert back to the name of Henry Robb Ltd when the Caledon Shipyard was closed in 1981 by British Shipbuilders Ltd as the Privatised enterprise was called at that time.
  Get Great Deals at Expedia!

The long pedigree of some of the shipyards in Scotland can understandably get a little bit confusing especially to non shipbuilders but that is not to say that this site is not worth a visit as it really is a great website for all interested in ships and the sea they just need to get some of the facts corrected as to where the actual ship was built, otherwise some people may get the impression that the yard at Dundee built twice as many ships as they actually did which would of course clearly be incorrect.




ShipSpotting.com
© frode adolfsen